Fuel line longevity

Technical Area for all the problems you have in the garage
CobStang
Forum member
Forum member
Posts: 280
Joined: Sat Dec 10, 2011 3:21 pm

Re: Fuel line longevity

Post by CobStang » Tue Jun 30, 2020 10:39 pm

Bear in mind that rubber fuel hose is double layered with reinforcing in between. Having contacted Gates to clarify their hose is E safe I was astounded to find the outer layer disintegrating when exposed to a leaking fitting. Going back to Gates and asking why ? was informed that only the inner layer was E compatible !!!!!!!!
Bonkers or what !

User avatar
Roger King
Posts: 4370
Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2007 10:29 pm
Location: St Ives, Cambs

Re: Fuel line longevity

Post by Roger King » Tue Jun 30, 2020 11:08 pm

Interesting! So how on earth are you meant to monitor the condition of that??

CobStang
Forum member
Forum member
Posts: 280
Joined: Sat Dec 10, 2011 3:21 pm

Re: Fuel line longevity

Post by CobStang » Wed Jul 01, 2020 8:03 am

Roger King wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 11:08 pm
Interesting! So how on earth are you meant to monitor the condition of that??
In the case of the leak, it was behind an undertray, so hidden from view.
So if using rubber hose it would be advisable to have all the joins accessible to view.

The answer is Teflon lined braided with pre formed end fittings.

User avatar
Roger King
Posts: 4370
Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2007 10:29 pm
Location: St Ives, Cambs

Re: Fuel line longevity

Post by Roger King » Wed Jul 01, 2020 8:37 am

I have used Viper's offering, amongst others:

https://www.viperperformance.co.uk/blog ... fuel-hose/

Out of interest, why would you require pre-formed fittings, Mark? I usually make up my own hoses.

CobStang
Forum member
Forum member
Posts: 280
Joined: Sat Dec 10, 2011 3:21 pm

Re: Fuel line longevity

Post by CobStang » Wed Jul 01, 2020 2:13 pm

Sorry, perhaps not the best terminology.
As you have linked, this type, not the mickey mouse shrouded jubilee clips.

https://www.viperperformance.co.uk/45_f ... ators.html

monster7
Forum member
Forum member
Posts: 69
Joined: Fri Jul 01, 2016 5:11 pm

Re: Fuel line longevity

Post by monster7 » Tue Aug 04, 2020 2:50 pm

stainless braid over PTFE will last also with E10, issue is only for rubber lines. As already said, there are Ethanol resistant solutions out there and replacement is not a big deal.

simonjrwinter
Posts: 747
Joined: Sun Jan 03, 2010 8:25 pm
Location: Upminster, Essex.

Re: Fuel line longevity

Post by simonjrwinter » Tue Aug 04, 2020 3:54 pm

I spoke to Gerry the other week and he agreed it time to replace the lot.
Simon
TR6 (V8) Hawk 289 FIA (V8) Doing my bit for global warming.

User avatar
peterc
Posts: 1385
Joined: Wed Mar 05, 2014 9:05 am
Location: Surrey

Re: Fuel line longevity

Post by peterc » Wed Aug 05, 2020 7:41 am

I guess we are all going to need to change the fuel lines sometime in the next year or certainly before the E10 is forced on us.
Roger, how did you get over the non original bling look of the red & blue anodised fittings. Just use the black ones?
We will need to check all the connecting threads e.g. fuel tank, fuel pump, isolating valve, fuel pressure regulator and carb to know what adapters are needed. I confess I just assembled what came with the kit from Gerry/ BGC.
For anyone considering changing over to fuel injection it looks like you would need to check the pressure rating of the self assembled units.
Peter C

User avatar
Roger King
Posts: 4370
Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2007 10:29 pm
Location: St Ives, Cambs

Re: Fuel line longevity

Post by Roger King » Wed Aug 05, 2020 10:04 am

If the consultation advice from the government is to be believed, the chances are that the 'preservation' grade fuel to be available following the introduction of E10 will be the current 98RON and not the 95 originally proposed. This would be a good result, as I use nothing else in any of my vehicles, including the old Land Rover. As now, that will contain between 0 and 5% ethanol.
As to the car, I used the black aluminium connectors to connect the hose to the tank. This is the only section of braided hose, which stops at a connector attached to a bracket on the LH main chassis tube adjacent to the LH engine mount. There is a black rubber tube to the Autolite mechanical fuel pump, then a rigid line that carries the fuel up the front of the engine and screws into the front of the Autolite 4100 with a brass connector incorporating a filter.
I would plan to change the black aluminium connector for the original type, but this won't be done in a hurry as on original tanks this is a) completely hidden from view, even from below, as the tank outlet is on the front vertical face of the fuel tank with the hose mounted along the inner side of the LH main chassis tube, by the transmission tunnel, and b) for the same reason, the black union is not accessible without removing the rear bulkhead panel behind the seats, which means careful peeling back of the trim to reveal the body rivets to allow drilling them all out for panel removal. Photo shows panel removed.
Cobra 496.jpg
Edit - that photo shows the inner wheelarches with their first leather trim covering, which was a smooth-grained modern leather. This has now been replaced with the correct semi-glossy grain. The bulkhead panel, not shown, is the only panel on a Cobra that was originally covered in black Rexine, along with the elasticated sidescreen pocket attached to the square-section frame tubes at each side of the aperture.
Last edited by Roger King on Thu Aug 06, 2020 8:12 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
peterc
Posts: 1385
Joined: Wed Mar 05, 2014 9:05 am
Location: Surrey

Re: Fuel line longevity

Post by peterc » Wed Aug 05, 2020 3:59 pm

Thanks for the info Roger.
I think I will over the coming months investigate the thread types in readiness. Certainly can’t assume that they are BSP but most likely a mixture.
Peter C

Post Reply